Jamie Peck at UW-T 2/10/16

HIPSTER LIFESTYLES,

HIGH-RISE LIVING,

HARD LIVES:

FASHIONING URBAN HEGEMONY AFTER THE CRISIS

DR. JAMIE PECK / UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

One of the most enduring tropes in the field of urban studies is the claim, principally associated with David Harvey, that North American and Western European cities have since the 1980s embraced “entrepreneurial” modes of governance, spurred by deindustrialization, heightened capital mobility, competitive insecurity, the rollback of fiscal transfers, and so forth. What began as an entrepreneurial “turn,” conspicuously represented by turnaround cities like Baltimore and Manchester and Barcelona, has since become something like an interurban truism, a banal condition of existence both experienced and reproduced by the majority of cities, even as their own positions and prospects continue to vary. Tracing this zigzagging process of normalization through various subsequent moments, such as the embrace of creativity, the imposition of austerity, and the rise of new economisms, the lecture reflects on the causes and consequences of this remaking of urban hegemony over the past three decades.

URBAN STUDIES ANNUAL LECTURE SERIES

DR. JAMIE PECK

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2016 / 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM

DOUGAN 280 

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON TACOMA 

For more information: 253-692-5880 or @uwturban@uw.edu

This lecture is FREE.

JAMIE PECK 

DR. JAMIE PECK IS CANADA RESEARCH CHAIR IN URBAN & REGIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY AND PROFESSOR OF GEOGRAPHY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLOMBIA, CANADA. With research interests in the political economy of neoliberalism, the politics of policy formation and mobility, economic governance, labor studies, and urban restructuring, his recent books include Fast policy: experimental statecraft at the thresholds of neoliberalism (Minnesota, 2015, with Nik Theodore), Constructions of neoliberal reason (Oxford, 2010), and the forthcoming Offshore (Oxford, 2016). Jamie Peck is the Managing Editor of Environment & Planning A and the coordinator of the Summer Institute in Economic Geography.

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About brandenborn

I'm a faculty member in Urban Design and Planning at the University of Washington. I'm interested in how societies plan, who is involved and who isn't, and the differential impacts of decision making on communities. I particularly like to think about food systems, and democracy or participation in social life. I also have this thing for school buses in general, and one in particular. Vamanos!

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